Why is robust evidence a placemaking holy grail?

We hear a lot about informed decision-making in relation to place and movement. Yet this week, the press has been full of challenges to supposedly well-researched Government positions. There’s HS2: with the Institute of Directors (among others) now calling the proposal madness. There was the Virgin Rail challenge to the numbers underlying the East Coast line. Can’t we ‘do’ robust evidence, the way medical researchers do?

We’ll be addressing these issues in PLACEmaking 2013/14. Email us if you have any ideas or comments.

Urbanists have long been the poor relations in their quest to demonstrate, and communicate, the value of investment in the urban realm: As John Dales writes in our sister publication Local Transport Today: ‘Not everything that can be counted counts; and what really counts can often not be counted’. Funding for urban realm and public space improvements has long been justified as an ‘add on’ to the hard case of transport investment. As Martina Juvara of SKM says: ‘We need to create a connection between the policy aspirations (by definition broad and flexible) and the hard justification of transport investment, strictly based on demand forecasts and transport efficiency, and to ‘speak multiple languages’ until a common ground of shared objectives is identified and supported by all parties, finding transport justifications for urban design improvements, and an economic and delivery framework for place-making.’

There is, thankfully, a growing realisation that the ‘value’ of key elements such as smarter travel, links between place, movement and investment potential, and the quality of the urban realm must be taken into consideration of we are to create places that people like, and that are resilient to ongoing change. The UK Government’s recent reports on road transport, however, seem to fly in the face of taking such an holistic approach. Where will it end? Here’s sample of some RUDI content on these issues to set the scene. Let us know what you think…

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